Jewelry in the Sketchbook

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I’ve been drawing some of my jewelry in my sketchbook lately. The one up above is a necklace I wear all the time, at least once a week. It was fun to color because it has both opaque and translucent gemstones.

I wear the second necklace less often, but often enough to keep it in my frequently-worn box. I thought it would be interesting to color because of the purplish sheen it gives off when light hits it. Plus, this one has a gold-tone chain, so I had a chance to color both gold-tone and silver-tone.

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Both were drawn with pencil, traced with multiliner, pencil erased, then colored with Copic marker.

I’m happier with the first than the second.

I hope to fit a couple more pieces of jewelry on this page!

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“Time Flies” Now Available for Purchase

Time Flies - whimsical art in colored pencil and ink

Time Flies – whimsical art in colored pencil and ink

This one means a lot to me personally. Young women fall through time, becoming old by the time they reach bottom. But hourglasses can be flipped…

I think this would be great for a journal cover or a whimsical take on the “over the hill” birthday card. Great for wall art as well.

Also available on bags, phone cases, laptop skins and more in my RedBubble shop.

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Passionate Earth Mandala Now Available

Passionate Earth Mandala Art

Passionate Earth Mandala Art

I’m excited to announce that my Passionate Earth Mandala is now available for purchase in my RedBubble shop.

It’s available as a single mandala on some products such as prints, throw pillows, and men’s graphic tees, and as a pattern on other products such as phone cases and hardcover journals.

I just love how the pattern turned out for this one.

Passionate Earth Mandala Pattern

Passionate Earth Mandala Pattern

Here are just a few of the products on which this design is now available. I find this mandala very primal and romantic. Some of these products would make great Valentine’s day gifts or cards.

PassionateEarthProducts

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Testing White Sharpies on Gray Toned Paper

Trying out new art supplies is so fun.  In the past my go-to white pen has been the widely-recommended Sakura gelly roll.  I have enjoyed using these pens, but they do sometimes have a problem getting started or flowing smoothly.  The Sakura gelly roll is the pen I used for the baby’s breath in the picture below.

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I recently found out that Sharpie makes a couple of different types of white markers.  I thought I’d give them a try to see how they compare.  I tested them on the same type of paper used in the baby’s breath picture: Strathmore gray toned sketch paper.

The first marker I tried was the extra fine point water based marker.  I loved this one.

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This is the type of marker that has to be shaken and have its tip pushed in several times to get flowing when it is new or when it has been sitting unused for awhile.  Once that was done It flowed smoothly, and made a line slightly wider than the Sakura.  The line was a little less bright, and didn’t stand off the page like the gelly roll ink.  However, I liked its somewhat chalky effect.  This is a case of two good media that produce different results but are both useful when their particular look is needed.  For example, I might actually have preferred this look for the baby’s breath up above.  However, my gelly roll still has a safe place in my pen cup.

I liked this marker so much that I played a bit more.

That about sums up my feelings about the white Sharpie extra fine point water based marker.

That about sums up my feelings about the white Sharpie extra fine point water based marker.

Next up was the white Sharpie “fine point” oil based marker.  Sharpie calls this a fine point, but it’s actually a much broader point than that name might imply.  I measured the width of its line at at least 2 mm.

I did the whole shake it and push in the nib repeatedly routine, and got the ink flowing.

White Sharpie oil based marker test.

White Sharpie oil based marker test.

Even so, the marks on the paper were much lighter than the marks on my finger.  It seems that these markers aren’t compatible with the paper I was using.  The problem was that the paper absorbed the marker like a sponge, leaving just a faint mark on the paper itself.  Still, judging from the marks on my fingers they would be great for use on a less absorbent material.  It’s even possible that this very faint white might come in handy to produce the effect of a soft glow.  It’s something to keep in mind, but mainly I’ll be planning to use this on other surfaces.

Here’s the final comparison, along with a gold oil based Sharpie line for comparison.  I think the paper seems to “disappear” the white more than the gold.  For comparison, the “by Edgar Allan Poe” is written in black Sharpie extra fine point permanent marker.

Comparing white Sakura gelly roll pen, white Sharpie water based marker, and white Sharpie oil based marker on gray Strathmore toned drawing paper.

Comparing white Sakura gelly roll pen, white Sharpie water based marker, and white Sharpie oil based marker on gray Strathmore toned drawing paper.

In case your wondering why Edgar Allan Poe is mentioned (because I’m nosy enough that I would wonder if I saw this somewhere!), there’s a good story about that.

I’m using an unfinished project as scrap paper.  Why?  Well, I think the following verse from Poe’s “To Helen” is heartbreakingly beautiful.

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Read it aloud to feel its power.  That tone-change in “to his own native shore,” right?

“Poe could get it,” I thought.  Followed closely with, “Oh, this would make a great Valentine’s Day card!”

But then I did some reading and found out that he’d written this not for a lover, but as a memorial to his good friend’s dead elderly mother who had also been a mother figure to Poe.  After reading that, it kind of didn’t feel right to use it as a romantic greeting anymore!  Therefore, scrap paper.

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Passionate Earth Mandala

Passionate Earth Mandala by Madam Doodle/Lynde VonHatten in marker and ink

Passionate Earth Mandala by Madam Doodle/Lynde VonHatten in marker and ink

There’s something primal about this one. A new mandala in the colors of soil and love.

Passionate Earth Mandala by Madam Doodle/Lynde VonHatten in marker and ink

Passionate Earth Mandala by Madam Doodle/Lynde VonHatten in marker and ink

The mandala was laid out in black pigma micron pen over lightly-drawn pencil guidelines.  If you’re interested in trying this, I’ve posted free step-by-step instructions showing one way to draw symmetrical mandalas.

Passionate Earth Mandala work in progress

Passionate Earth Mandala work in progress

After it was laid out I erased the guidelines and started coloring with Copic markers.

Passionate Earth Mandala work in progress

Passionate Earth Mandala work in progress

Finally, I touched it up and added details with black Sharpies and a white Sakura gelly roll pen. Why start with micron pens but finish with Sharpie? Because micron pens can be colored over with alcohol markers without bleeding. Sharpies are cheaper but are also alcohol based, so they can’t be added until the other alcohol markers have dried. I use them when I can, but only when I’m through with the other alcohol markers.

Passionate Earth Mandala by Madam Doodle/Lynde VonHatten in marker and ink

Passionate Earth Mandala by Madam Doodle/Lynde VonHatten in marker and ink

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New Notebooks

Not all who wander are lost notebook, available in Madam Doodle's Red Bubble Shop

Not all who wander are lost notebook, available in Madam Doodle’s Red Bubble Shop

My husband is about to start a new semester in college and I like to buy pretty things, so we both had good reasons to order spiral notebooks from my own RedBubble shop. I am so glad we did! Seeing my designs on these notebooks is like seeing my babies all grown up. I was glad to see that the covers are so crisply printed, to show off even the fine line details of the drawings.

Pear Squares notebook, available in Madam Doodle's RedBubble shop

Pear Squares notebook, available in Madam Doodle’s RedBubble shop

These are 5-inch by 8-inch spiral notebooks, the “half size” ones that are good for journaling, note taking, and to-do lists. They come with two pockets at the end, and the lines are a soothing gray color. These and many other designs are available as notebooks and other products like phone cases, posters, and note cards in my RedBubble shop.
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How to Draw a Symmetrical Mandala

Drawing mandalas is relaxing and therapeutic, and the finished product can be extremely beautiful. From colorful to black-and-white, from simple to extraordinarily elaborate, there is infinite room for variety in this soothing art form. Sometimes it’s fun to simply doodle mandalas freehand, but when you’d like to be sure that your work is symmetrical there is an easy technique to help you do so.

This may look like a lot of steps, but once you get started you will find it almost intuitive.  Personally, I find drawing the guidelines themselves to be very relaxing.

You will need:

  • A compass that locks into position
  • A ruler
  • A pencil for drawing guidelines. If you have a hard drawing pencil, better yet.
  • A good pencil eraser.
  • A pen or marker for drawing the mandala. You might like black sharpies, black multiliner pens, or other bold inks with good staying power.
  • Something for coloring your mandala, if desired.

IMPORTANT: Draw all of the pencil lines as lightly as possible as they will all be erased later.  If you have a hard drawing pencil rather than a regular #2, it will make the erasing even easier.

1. Mark a point near the center of your paper.  This will be the center point of your mandala.  Use your compass to draw a circle about 1/3 the width of your paper.

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Mortality

whimsical colored pencil art

Mortality by Lynde VonHatten – Ink and Colored Pencil – 2016

My Mortality drawing is complete and ready to scan.

The young grow old as they fall through time. What happens when you flip the hourglass?

Watch here or on my social media accounts for updates about when Mortality products will be available for purchase.

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Working at Night

Doing art at night under an Ottlite

Doing art at night under an Ottlite

I’ve been working on coloring my Mortality drawing today. I decided to go with colored pencil, mainly because there are a lot of tiny spaces to color in this piece.  I like the results so far, and can’t wait to see this finished.  I think of it as a cute expression of a kind of serious subject, but I think it would make a good “getting older” type birthday card, too.

I worked bit by bit throughout the day in between all the other things I was doing, and when it got dark I didn’t have to stop thanks to my Ottlite. I just have a cheap folding desktop model and it has made it possible for me to keep working after dark on many occasions. Well worth it in my opinion!  Highly recommended if you do color-sensitive work and don’t want to be limited to working in daylight hours.  (No one paid me to say that, pinkie swear.)

This will take some time…there are forty-nine little ladies, each needing some undivided attention when her time comes.  I post my progress here or on the social media sites listed in the sidebar.

Peace.

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